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Content tagged with "bee"

Broadsides from the Ozarks

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Sue Hubbell left her job as a librarian at an eastern university and found life in the Ozarks with 300 hives of bees and a newspaper column.

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photo of bumblebee on a wild rose flower

Bumblebee

Bumblebees are large and fuzzy, with black and yellow (sometimes orange), usually banded, coloration. Females have pollen baskets on the last pair of legs.

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photo of bumblebee on a wild rose flower

Bumblebees

At least six species in the genus Bombus in Missouri
Bumblebees are fuzzy, familiar and are like huge honeybees: They are yellow and black, collect pollen and nectar, live in colonies and make honey. They are capable of stinging, if molested or if their nest is endangered, but you need not fear them; they are not aggressive.

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Cavity Creatures

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Many wildlife creatures might call an old snag tree home.

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Photo of leaf fragments and other materials in cocoon cells of leafcutter bee

Contents of Leafcutter Bee Nest

Leafcutter bees are solitary and don't live in hives. The females construct tubular nests in the soil or in some kind of elongated hole (as in a hollow twig). The nests are lined with small circles of leaves that the females clip from plants, and provisioned with nectar and pollen. Each chamber receives one egg.

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Photo of lilac leaves damaged by a leafcutter bee

Damage Caused By A LeafCutter Bee

Leafcutter bees busily cut leaf and flower pieces from preferred plants and use them to build capsulelike cells. One sign of their presence is the rounded holes they cut in the leaves of plants.

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Photo of an eastern carpenter bee

Eastern Carpenter Bee

Eastern carpenter bees somewhat resemble bumblebees but have a noticeably black, shiny abdomen. (Bumblebees, although about the same size and shape, have a noticeably fuzzy abdomen, usually with a prominent yellow band across it.)

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Photo of an eastern carpenter bee

Eastern Carpenter Bee

Xylocopa virginica
Eastern carpenter bees somewhat resemble bumblebees but have a noticeably black, shiny abdomen. Also, they are rather solitary and excavate their nests in wood. Carpenter bee nests are provisioned in the spring and summer.

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Photo of eastern carpenter bee nest, cutaway to show chambers

Eastern Carpenter Bee Nest Chambers

This is a cutaway view of a carpenter bee nest. The female provisions her tunnels with nectar and pollen, then lays eggs on this food, which nourishes the young as they develop. The nest plugs and cell partitions are made of wood chips; the cell walls are unlined. Each cell houses one egg/larva, plus its food.

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Photo of eastern carpenter bee with entrance to nest hole

Eastern Carpenter Bee With Nest Hole

Carpenter bees are rather solitary and excavate their nests in wood. They prefer coniferous wood, such as pine, cedar, or the cypress seen here. They often reuse old nests, cleaning them of debris and enlarging them. A small pile of sawdust beneath a hole about 3/8 inch in diameter is a clue to their presence.

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