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Content tagged with "finch"

Photograph of a male American Goldfinch in breeding plumage

American Goldfinch

Spinus tristis
Goldfinches are often seen in flocks during fall, winter, and spring and at bird feeders. In spring, the male’s dull winter plumage changes to bright yellow with a black cap and wings.

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photo of American goldfinch

American Goldfinch

Photo of American goldfinch.

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American Goldfinch

Video of an American goldfinch in the wild.

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Photograph of a female American goldfinch in breeding plumage

American Goldfinch (Female in Breeding Plumage)

In breeding plumage, the upperparts of the female are greenish yellow, with dark wings and tail; the underparts are pale yellowish.

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Photograph of a female American goldfinch in winter plumage

American Goldfinch (Female in Winter Plumage)

In winter plumage, the female American goldfinch is grayer with brownish wings.

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Photograph of a male American Goldfinch in breeding plumage

American Goldfinch (Male in Breeding Plumage)

In breeding plumage, the upperparts of a male American goldfinch are bright yellow, with black wings, tail, and forehead, and 2 white wing bars and tail spots. The underparts are bright yellow.

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Photograph of a male American Goldfinch in winter plumage

American Goldfinch (Male in Winter Plumage)

In winter, the male American goldfinch resembles the female, with brownish underparts, blackish wings, and yellowish face. Note also the yellow shoulders, and the start of the black cap above the bill.

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Consider the Goldfinch

When I looked at the Natural Events Calendar on my office wall today, the event for Aug. 7 was “Goldfinches begin nesting as thistles go to seed.”

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Photograph of a female Purple Finch perching on a twig

Female Purple Finch (Perching)

Purple finches, both males and females, are often confused with their close relatives, the house finches. Purple finches of both sexes have a light eyebrow line and a strongly notched tail.

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Photograph of a male House Finch

House Finch

Haemorhous mexicanus
A time traveler from the 1970s or before would be amazed to see so many house finches in Missouri, for they are native to the West. Learn about this now-common backyard bird.

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