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Content tagged with "migratory bird"

Indigo Bunting

Always Coming Home

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To thrive, migratory birds must find favorable habitat throughout the year, throughout the Americas.

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Photo of male Baltimore oriole perched on branch

Baltimore Oriole

Icterus galbula
Often, you'll hear the male Baltimore oriole's loud, flutelike song before you locate the bright orange singer as he moves among the boughs of trees.

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Image of a Baltimore oriole eating orange from a feeder

Baltimore Oriole

Baltimore orioles come to nectar feeders and will consume the pulp of oranges cut in half. They forage in trees for caterpillars, beetles, fruit, and flower nectar. During winter (when the orioles are in Central America), they drink mostly nectar from flowers.

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Photo of a female Baltimore oriole perched

Baltimore Oriole Female

The upperparts of the female Baltimore oriole are olive brown above, with dark streaks and bars on the head and back. The underparts are dull orange yellow with some dark mottling on the throat.

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Photo of fledgling Baltimore oriole

Baltimore Oriole Fledgling

Baltimore orioles typically lay clutches of 3-7 eggs, which are incubated for about two weeks. The young, like those of most other tree nesting birds, are helpless upon hatching. They are cared for by their parents in the nest for about two weeks before fledging.

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Photo of male Baltimore oriole perched on branch

Baltimore Oriole Male

Often, you'll hear the male Baltimore oriole’s loud, flutelike song before you locate the bright-orange singer as he moves among the boughs of trees. The voice is a clear, whistled series of musical notes that usually contain the whistled call “tchew lee.”

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Photo of male Baltimore oriole at nest

Baltimore Oriole Male At Nest

Finding an oriole’s nest in summer isn’t easy. Hidden in the upper branches of a tall maple or elm, the nest looks like a gray basket, woven of milkweed silk, plant fibers, and hair.

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Photo of an adult barn swallow perched on barbed wire.

Barn Swallow

Streamlined, agile fliers with forked tails, barn swallows build their cup-shaped nests out of mud in protected areas on the walls of barns and under bridges. Underparts are buff or cinnamon with a dark chestnut throat. The lighter belly is separated from the throat by a narrow blue-black band.

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Photo of an adult barn swallow.

Barn Swallow

Adult upperparts of barn swallows are dark iridescent blue black, and the tail is long and forked. The tails are much longer in adults than they are in juveniles.

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Photo of an adult barn swallow calling.

Barn Swallow

The song of barn swallows is a long, twittering chatter with guttural sounds interspersed. Call notes are sharp kit-kit or svit-svit sounds.

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