Search

Content tagged with "pond snail"

Photo of a gilled aquatic snail

Gilled Aquatic Snail (Prosobranch)

Prosobranch snails breathe with gills, and they also possess a hard trapdoor-like operculum. In Missouri, these types of snails are most commonly encountered in the Ozarks. There are about 20 species in Missouri.

Read more

Photo of gilled snail showing operculum

Gilled Aquatic Snail (View of Operculum)

The operculum of gilled snails functions like a hard little trapdoor that closes when the animal retracts into its shell. It protects against predators and can keep the snail from drying out.

Read more

Photo of a gilled aquatic snail

Gilled Aquatic Snails (Prosobranch Pond Snails)

Over 20 Missouri species in former subclass Prosobranchia
Gilled snails are one of two main groups of aquatic snails in Missouri (the other group is the "lunged" snails). Gilled snails, or prosobranchs, breathe with gills and possess a hard trapdoor-like operculum. They are most common in the Ozarks.

Read more

Photo of pulmonate snail crawling on rock

Lunged Aquatic Snail (Pulmonate Pond Snail)

Unliked gilled aquatic snails, lunged aquatic snails breathe via a lunglike pulmonary cavity. They also lack an operculum, the hard horny “trapdoor” that closes when the animal retracts into the shell.

Read more

Photo of pulmonate snail crawling on rock out of water

Lunged Aquatic Snail (Pulmonate Pond Snail)

Many pulmonate snails crawl to the water surface to take in air, but others can stay underwater all the time. This snail was crawling on a dry rock on the edge of a creek. Except for in the Ozarks, pulmonate snails predominate in most of the aquatic regions in our state.

Read more

Photo of pulmonate snail crawling on rock

Lunged Aquatic Snails (Pulmonate Pond Snails)

Over 30 Missouri species in former subclass Pulmonata
This is one of the two broad categories of aquatic snails in Missouri (the other is the gilled snails, or prosobranchs). Pulmonate snails breathe via a lunglike pulmonary cavity, and they lack a hard trapdoor-like operculum. Except for in the Ozarks, pulmonate snails predominate in most of the aquatic regions in our state.

Read more

Ramshorn Snails (Wheel Snails; Planorbids)

Gyraulus, Helisoma, Menetus, Micromenetus, Planorbula spp.
This group of freshwater snails is easy to identify at a glance, because the shell is a flat, disklike coil. Like other pulmonate snails, they lack an operculum (a hard horny “trapdoor” that other types of aquatic snails possess that closes when the animal retracts into the shell).

Read more