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Content tagged with "skink"

Photo of a broad-headed skink, a striped, brownish lizard, held in a hand

Broad-Headed Skink

Broad-headed skinks have a large, wide head and, during the breeding season, the heads of males become slightly swollen and orangish-red. The rest of the body has a few faint stripes. Adult females are more prominently marked with light and dark stripes.

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Photo of Broad-headed skink on ground among leaves

Broad-Headed Skink

This large, harmless, smooth-scaled lizard lives along the edge of forests and woodlots. It often makes its home in a large dead tree, sometimes using abandoned woodpecker holes or other cavities.

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Photo of a female broad-headed skink held in a person's hands.

Broad-Headed Skink

Oldtimers used to call broad-headed skinks "scorpions," but these lizards are completely unrelated to those spider-like creatures and are certainly not poisonous. This photo was taken in Florida.

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Photo of a broad-headed skink on a tree trunk in Florida.

Broad-Headed Skink

This is Missouri's largest forest-dwelling skink. Broad-headed skinks spend much of their time in large trees but will come to the ground to search for insects. This photo was taken in Florida.

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Photo of Broad-headed skink on ground among leaves

Broad-Headed Skink

Plestiodon laticeps
The broad-headed skink is a large, harmless, smooth-scaled lizard that lives along the edge of forests and woodlots. It often makes its home in a large dead tree, sometimes using abandoned woodpecker holes or other cavities.

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Image of a five-lined skink

Five-Lined Skink

Plestiodon fasciatus
Often called the "blue-tailed" skink for the coloration of juveniles, this is Missouri's most common skink. Adults are olive or tan with lengthwise stripes.

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photo of a Five-Lined Skink Guarding Eggs

Five-Lined Skink Guarding Eggs

A female five-lined skink guards her eggs.

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Great Plains Skink

Plestiodon obsoletus
A tan or light brown lizard with most of the scales edged in black, making it look speckled. These markings may form irregular lines along the back and sides. In Missouri, found only in our far western and southwestern counties.

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little brown skink

Little Brown Skink (Ground Skink)

Scincella lateralis
Aptly named, these ground-dwellers have dark brown or black stripes and speckling along their sides. Hiking along a forest trail, you may hear these small lizards scurrying through dead leaves, but you seldom see them.

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Image of a northern prairie skink

Northern Prairie Skink

Plestiodon septentrionalis septentrionalis
There are two subspecies of prairie skinks in Missouri, and they look quite similar. In general, they both have longer tails than all other Missouri skinks. In Missouri, these lizards are rare.

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