Search

Content tagged with "spring wildflower"

Photo of Adam and Eve orchid leaf

Adam and Eve Orchid (Leaf)

Adam and Eve orchids have leaves from September all the way through winter. There's a good chance you've noticed this orchid on your winter hikes and wondered about its strange appearance: a green-and-white-striped, pleated leaf lying flat upon the dead leaves on the forest floor. Check back in May to see its flowers!

Read more

Photo of Adam and Eve orchid flowers

Adam and Eve Orchid (Putty Root)

Aplectrum hyemale
There's a good chance you've noticed this orchid on your winter hikes and wondered about its strange appearance: a green-and-white-striped, pleated leaf lying flat upon the dead leaves on the forest floor. Check back in May to see its flowers!

Read more

Photo of Adam and Eve orchid flowers

Adam and Eve Orchid (Putty Root) (Flowers)

Flowers arise on a bare stem and are light to dark brown and about ½ inch long. They are sometimes slightly purple toward the base of the 3 sepals and petals. The lip is small, white, with 3 lobes and magenta markings. The leaves of this orchid wither away by flowering time in May and June.

Read more

Photo of American feverfew flower cluster.

American Feverfew (Wild Quinine)

Parthenium integrifolium
A common component of high-quality upland prairie, American feverfew, or wild quinine, is a native wildflower that was used to treat fevers or malaria. It's in the composite family.

Read more

Photo of American feverfew plant with flower cluster.

American Feverfew (Wild Quinine)

A common component of high-quality upland prairie, American feverfew, or wild quinine, is a native wildflower that was used to treat fevers or malaria. It's in the composite family.

Read more

Photo of American feverfew flower cluster.

American Feverfew (Wild Quinine) Flowers

The flowerheads of American feverfew grow in flat-topped or slightly rounded, fuzzy white clusters about ¼ inch wide. The petal-like ray florets are few, tiny, and inconspicuous. It blooms May–September.

Read more

Photo of American water willow showing plant with flowers

American Water Willow

American water willow is common on gravel bars and other stream banks throughout much of Missouri. The dense colonies of emergent stems have leaves like a willow’s, but the two-lipped flowers resemble little orchids.

Read more

Photo of American water willow closeup on flowers

American Water Willow

Justicia americana
American water willow is common on gravel bars and other stream banks throughout much of Missouri. The dense colonies of emergent stems have leaves like a willow’s, but the two-lipped flowers resemble little orchids.

Read more

Photo of American water willow closeup on flowers

American Water Willow (Flowers)

The flowers of water willow are nothing like the catkins of true willows. They are clustered into headlike groups and are about ¾ inch long with a notched upper lip and a 3-lobed lower lip. The upper lip is light purple, rarely white; the lower lip white or pale purple with purple markings. It blooms May through October.

Read more

Photo of bastard toadflax plant with flowers

Bastard Toadflax (False Toadflax)

Comandra umbellata (formerly C. richardsiana)
Despite its coarse-sounding name, bastard toadflax is one of the hundreds of wildflowers that bejewel our native prairies. A perennial herb with yellowish-green foliage and smooth, upright stems, it grows and flowers under the hottest conditions.

Read more