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Content tagged with "wild edible"

Photo of American ginseng plant with ripe berries

American Ginseng

Panax quinquefolius
Wild and cultivated ginseng produce an annual crop in the United States and Canada valued in excess of $25 million, but overzealous collection is causing serious concern about the survival of American ginseng in the forest ecosystem.

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Photo of red American ginseng berry cluster

American Ginseng Berries

Unlimited harvests have made ginseng decline or disappear in many places. The ginseng trade is regulated internationally and under the Missouri Wildlife Code, with an official collecting season (usually Sept. 1 through Dec. 31, when fruits are on the plants). Diggers can help by squeezing the seeds from fruits into the hole left after the root is excavated.

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Photo of American ginseng in bloom

American Ginseng in Bloom

Small, insignificant greenish white flowers emerge in May-July on a stalk emerging from the base of the whorl of leaves.

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Photo of American ginseng plant on forest floor

American Ginseng in Forest

American ginseng grows in hardwood forests on shady, well-drained, north- and east-facing slopes in predominantly porous, humus-rich soils, and often in ravines.

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Photo of ginseng plant with hand for scale

American Ginseng Leaves

Leaves occur in a whorl at the top of the stem, and each leaf is palmately compound, with 3 to 5 leaflets.

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Photo of American ginseng plant with ripe berries

American Ginseng Plant with Ripe Berries

Long valued as a medicinal plant, ginseng is an annual crop in the United States and Canada valued in excess of $25 million, but overzealous collection is causing serious concern about the survival of American ginseng in the forest ecosystem.

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Photo of Bradbury beebalm plant with pale flowers

Beebalm (Bradbury Beebalm)

Monarda bradburiana (sometimes called M. russeliana)
Also called horsemint and wild bergamot, beebalm is a showy, fragrant plant that is a favorite of native plant gardeners. It’s also a favorite of Missouri’s butterflies!

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Photo of Bradbury beebalm plant with pale flowers

Beebalm (Bradbury Beebalm)

The flowers of Bradbury beebalm are often white or pale lavender with purple spots. Note the unbranching stems and the sessile (stalkless) leaves. Also called horsemint and wild bergamot, this showy, fragrant plant is a favorite of native plant gardeners.

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Photo of Bradbury beebalm plant with pinkish flowers

Beebalm (Bradbury Beebalm)

Bradbury beebalm is a clump-forming perennial with square, unbranched stems. All parts of the plant have a pleasant aroma. Flowers normally in 1 terminal cluster, subtended by many small leaves that frequently are rose-purple. The flowers themselves vary from white to lavender to pinkish.

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Poison warnings for specific plants/wild edibles.

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