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Heritage Program Terms and Definitions

Federal Status

The federal status is derived from the provisions of the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended, which is administered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Passage of the Endangered Species Act of 1973 gave the United States one of the most far-reaching laws ever enacted by any country to prevent the extinction of imperiled animals and plants. Protecting endangered and threatened species and restoring them to the point where their existence is no longer jeopardized is the primary objective of the Fish and Wildlife Service’s Endangered Species Program.

E: Endangered:
Any species which is in danger of extinction throughout all or a significant portion of its range.
T: Threatened:
Any species which is likely to become endangered within the foreseeable future.
C: Candidate:
Plants or animals which the Service is reviewing for possible addition to the list of endangered and threatened species.
PE: Proposed Endangered:
Species officially proposed for listing as endangered; final ruling not yet made.
PT: Proposed Threatened:
Species officially proposed for listing as threatened; final ruling not yet made.

State Status

Rule 3CSR10-4.111 of the Wildlife Code of Missouri and certain state statutes apply to state Code listed species.

E: “Endangered”:
Determined by the Department of Conservation under constitutional authority.

Global Rank

A numeric rank (G1 through G5) of relative endangerment based primarily on the number of occurrences of the Element (i.e., species, subspecies, or variety) globally. Other factors in addition to the number of occurrences are considered when assigning a rank, so the numbers of occurrences suggested for each numeric rank below are not absolute guidelines.

G1: Critically Imperiled:
Critically imperiled globally because of extreme rarity or because of some factor(s) making it especially vulnerable to extinction. Typically 5 or fewer occurrences or very few remaining individuals (<1,000) or acres (<2000) or linear miles.
G2: Imperiled:
Imperiled globally because of rarity or because of some factor(s) making it very vulnerable to extinction or elimination. Typically 6 to 20 occurrences or few remaining individuals (1,000 to 3,000) or acres (2,000 to 10,000) or linear miles (10 to 50).
G3: Vulnerable:
Vulnerable globally either because very rare and local throughout its range, found only in a restricted range (even if abundant at some locations), or because of other factors making it vulnerable to extinction or elimination. Typically 21 to 100 occurrences or between 3,000 and 10,000 individuals.
G4: Apparently Secure:
Uncommon but not rare (although it may be rare in parts of its range, particularly on the periphery), and usually widespread. Apparently not vulnerable in most of its range, but possibly cause for long-term concern. Typically more than 100 occurrences and more than 10,000 individuals.
G5: Secure:
Common; widespread and abundant (although it may be rare in parts of its range, particularly on the periphery). Not vulnerable in most of its range. Typically with considerably more than 100 occurrences and more than 10.000 individuals.
G#G#: Range Rank:
A numeric range rank (e.g., G2G3) is used to indicate uncertainty about the exact status of a taxon. Ranges cannot skip more than one rank (e.g., GU should be used rather than G1G4).
GNR: Not Ranked:
Status has not been assessed.
GU: Unrankable:
Currently unrankable due to lack of information or due to substantially conflicting information about status or trends. Note: Whenever possible, the most likely rank is assigned and the question mark qualifier is added (e.g., G2?) to express uncertainty, or a range rank (e.g., G2G3) is used to delineate the limits (range) of uncertainty.
GH: Possibly Extinct/Extirpated:
Known from only historical occurrences, but may nevertheless still be extant; further searching needed.
GX: Presumed Extinct:
Believed to be extinct throughout its range. Not located despite intensive searches of historical sites and other appropriate habitat, and virtually no likelihood that it will be rediscovered.

Subrank:

T: Taxonomic Subdivision:
Rank applies to a subspecies or variety.

Qualifiers:

?: Inexact Numeric Rank:
Denotes inexact numeric rank. (The ? is not used in combination with range ranks.)
Q: Questionable Taxonomy:
Distinctiveness of this entity as a taxon or community at the current level is questionable; resolution of this uncertainty may result in change from a species to a subspecies or hybrid, inclusion of this taxon in another taxon, or inclusion of this community within another community, with the resulting Element having a lower-priority (numerically higher) conservation status rank.

State Rank

A numeric rank (S1 through S5) of relative endangerment based primarily on the number of occurrences of the Element (i.e., species, subspecies, or variety) within the state. Other factors considered when assigning a rank include: abundance, population trends, distribution, number of protected sites, degree of threat, suitable habitat trends, level of survey effort and life history. Thus, the number of occurrences suggested for each numeric rank below are not absolute guidelines. Missouri species of conservation concern typically do not fall within the range of S4-S5.

S1: Critically Imperiled:
Critically imperiled in the nation or state because of extreme rarity or because of some factor(s) making it especially vulnerable to extirpation from the state. Typically 5 or fewer occurrences or very few remaining individuals (<1,000).
S2: Imperiled:
Imperiled in the nation or state because of rarity or because of some factor(s) making it very vulnerable to extirpation from the nation or state (1,000 to 3,000).
S3: Vulnerable:
Vulnerable in the nation or state either because rare and uncommon, or found only in a restricted range (even if abundant at some locations), or because of other factors making it vulnerable to extirpation. Typically 21 to 100 occurrences or between 3,000 and 10,000 individuals.
S4: Apparently Secure:
Uncommon but not rare, and usually widespread in the nation or state. Possible cause of long-term concern. Usually more than 100 occurrences and more than 10,000 individuals.
S5: Secure:
Common, widespread, and abundant in the nation or state. Essentially ineradicable under present conditions. Typically with considerably more than 100 occurrences and more than 10,000 individuals.
S#S#: Range Rank:
A numeric range rank (e.g., S2S3) is used to indicate the range of uncertainty about the exact status of the Element. Ranges cannot skip more than one rank (e.g., SU is used rather than S1S4).
S?: Unranked:
Species is not yet ranked in the state.
SU: Unrankable:
Currently unrankable due to lack of information or due to substantially conflicting information about status or trends.
SE: Exotic:
An exotic established in the state; may be native in nearby regions (e.g., house finch or catalpa in eastern U.S.)
SA: Accidental/Nonregular:
Accidental or casual in the state (i.e., infrequent and outside usual range).
SP: Potential:
Potentially occurring in the state but no occurrences reported.
SR: Reported:
Element reported in the state but without persuasive documentation which would provide a basis for either accepting or rejecting (e.g., misidentified specimen) the report.
SRF: Reported Falsely:
Element erroneously reported in the state and the error has persisted in the literature.
SH: Historical:
Element occurred historically in the state (with expectation that it may be rediscovered). Perhaps having not been verified in the past 20 years, and suspected to be still extant.
SX: Extirpated:
Element is believed to be extirpated from the state.

Qualifiers:

?: Inexact or Uncertain:
Denotes inexact or uncertain numeric rank. (The ? qualifies the character immediately preceding it in the SRANK. The ? is not used in combination with range ranks.)

Key Messages: 

Missourians care about conserving forests, fish and wildlife.

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